103 - John Maher Locations

Lawrence Lewis:

Hello, everyone, this is Lawrence Lewis.

 

Sister Christian:

And this is Sister Christian.

 

Lawrence Lewis:

Today is Thursday, March 19th, 2020. And in case you missed the last two episodes we are two film producers. I'm from Los Angeles, and Christian is from New York City. And just a little more than a week ago, we released the first episode of a new podcast we created called The Producers Happy Hour. It was meant to be a show where two producers on opposite coasts chatted over drinks about what it meant to be a good producer.

 

Sister Christian:

But things have changed very quickly. And now, we’re going to take this opportunity to reach far and wide in to our filmmaking community to see who is working, who's not working and what the future looks like for commercial shoots as well as TV and film. We want to hear your stories. We need to hear your stories. People need to know that we're all in this together,

 

Lawrence Lewis:

So please send us your questions or tell us what is happening with you and your work. You can email us at producershappyhour@gmail.com, or, better yet, record a one minute voice memo and email it to that same address. Just follow the instructions at our website www.producershappyhour.com

 

Sister Christian:

We're not journalist, but we are facilitators and storytellers. And we think there's value in that. And we want to use our skills to bring our community together and share stories with each other, so we don't feel so alone in this difficult time.

 

Lawrence Lewis:

Great. So, Christian, you know, we kind of pivoted really quickly and rushed out in episode yesterday. We have an interview today with John Maher, who's a great location manager based in New York, who's got some very vital information that he's going to share with us. But before we get into that, I don't think the audience even knows who we are just because we rushed us out so quickly. So if you don't mind, I want to take a moment to introduce you.

 

Sister Christian:

Yes.

 

Lawrence Lewis: 

I met you, um, many years ago. I don't want to say how many. We’re production managers. We met it. RSA Ridley Scott. You're based in New York. I'm based in L. A. But I was out there doing some work. We became fast friends and started sharing jobs with each other and knowledge. And, uh, since then you've been producing all kinds of content commercials, promos, live events, you’re a valuable resource in New York, you know, all the crew, and you know, all the ins and outs of that city and its great to have you as part of this podcast.

 

Sister Christian:

Well, Lawrence, you've for sure are both coasts and equally versed in L. A in New York, in my opinion. Yes, we've known each other, we’ll just call it forever right now. 

 

Lawrence Lewis:

Yeah, Let's just call it that. 

 

Sister Christian:

I know, because we both do, you know, you do content you do standard commercials, film, even as much as voiceover work, animation work. It's all there. I mean, you're the full package. So, I mean, it's true! You’re a valuable asset. I'm always reaching out to you to find out who I should use as an AD in LA or where am I going to you know, who's the latest and greatest caterer? So, I think we both thrive on knowing each other and benefit a lot from our relationship with each other.

Lawrence Lewis:

Absolutely. And we wanted to start a little podcast. A light hearted fun little chat about producers over drinks, literally drinking every episode, um, and interviewing industry professionals to find out what it means to them to have a good producer support them. That was the whole point of this. But then all this happened, Uh, and obviously we switched up. So now we think it's important to share people's stories even if, you know, I was talking to somebody on linked in. He's like, I don't have much of a story. I'm just now working from home. Well, that is a story you're working. Most people in L. A and New York aren't working right now, so it's good t share that. Tell us what company it is. Tell us what kind of work you  do. Just hearing people's voices out there that are still making their way through this really challenging time is important. It will all help us feel much more closer,

 

Sister Christian:

Right. And just remembering that last week, we were all still trying to figure out how we would be filming this week. And this week on Monday, we all realized it's gone. 

 

Lawrence Lewis:

It's gone. 

 

Sister Christian:

Nobody’s filming right now. Ah, we should not be gathering in groups of more than 10 even though, oddly, the both the mayor's office in New York and the L A permit office also are saying crew of 50 or less, they're still approving, which is in direct opposition 

 

Lawrence Lewis:

Contradiction.

 

Sister Christian: 

Exactly 

 

Lawrence Lewis:

it is being told to us by our governors and state officials. So everyone out there be smart. Be safe, wash your hands, don't touch your face. Be really thoughtful. If you really need to be doing a film, shoot with 50 people right now. Because the way this virus spreads that can lead to more problems than that paycheck is worth.

 

Sister Christian:

Exactly. And I should also mention that my middle name should have been Christian faced toucher Kendrick. Oh, you. But also I'm definitely learning everyone, definitely learning that I need to stop, you know, touching my face. Maybe I just need a couple of oven mitts. You were, so I just didn't do it. Don't do it.

 

Lawrence Lewis:

Don't do it. Don't do it. There's a great website that's a live updated website that has all the statistics of Covid19. How many states have cases, confirmed cases, how many countries have confirmed cases and, um we're going to put that in the show notes, because it's a valuable resource just to start tracking your state and seeing how things were progressing. Right now, Christian, it says we have 237,000 plus known cases across the globe. In your state New York, 4152 you've actually surpassed Washington. They were the leading state have the most cases, but you surpass him a few days ago, 

 

Sister Christian:

Yes.

 

Lawrence Lewis:

In California’s jumped up to 875. Everyone is listening, come to this website and see a live update of how many cases are in their states.

 

Sister Christian:

I do have to say to their, um, as much as it is showing, uh, what new cases are popping up, it is also showing how many people have recovered. So there is a bit of hope on the website. Uh, you know, just a little bit of hope there.

 

Lawrence Lewis:

a little bit of hope there. So, Christian. We have an interview with a location manager, John Maher, little bit later, but I want to share some news updates.

 

Sister Christian:

That would be great.

 

Lawrence Lewis:

I'm sure everyone's seen these, but we're going to link to them all in our show notes. Hollywood Reporter says that there are more than 120 thousand entertainment jobs that have been lost due to this pandemic.

 

Sister Christian:

Since when?

 

Lawrence Lewis:

More than 120,000 film & tv jobs are estimated to have been lost since the start of the Corona outbreak. According to the individual correspondence that the Local Cinematographer’s Guild, Local 600 the Motion Editor’s Guild, Local 700 sent out to members. So this is a kind of self reported, self study, of whose been put out of work because of this pandemic. The Motion Picture Editor Guild Executive Director Cathy Repola wrote Wednesday in a message: “This is a devastating time for the entire IATSE family.” And she went on to say that: “IATSE has been successful at securing a standardized two weeks of pay for more responsible employers. The IATSE intends to address those employers who are not following suit.” So it looks like the guilds are trying to talk with the production company's about some sort of severance for people that are being let go.

 

Sister Christian:

And that sounds like, it's for right now it looks like it's TV and film. Is that including our commercial brothers and sisters?

 

Lawrence Lewis:

So yeah, it's hard to say what this means. Is this going to apply to commercial crew as well as television and film? Think there's a lot of questions to be answered. The IATSE International president, Matthew D. Loeb, this week urged Congress to include displaced entertainment workers in a relief package and asked members to sign this online petition. So that's the petition of being linked to also in the show notes, which I'm sure many people seeing around on social media

 

Sister Christian:

I saw posted on CoPros, definitely signed it.

 

Lawrence Lewis:

Yep, I did, too. So that petition, what it says is the bipartisan Families First Corona Virus Response Act is a good start to provide relief to workers. However, the provisions on the table for emergency paid leave benefits won't apply to displaced entertainment workers because of the requirement for days worked on a job to qualify. This is something we all go through, right? You know. It's like we're employed for 3, 4, 5 for producers and production crew, maybe 10, 15 days at a time. So our employment looks unusual for all these kind of standard.

 

Sister Christian:

And it's hard to track.

 

Lawrence Lewis:

It's hard to track. 

 

Sister Christian:

Exactly.

 

Lawrence Lewis:

So I think that puts a lot of us in this weird gray zone of social services.

 

Sister Christian:

Yeah, because rules designed specifically for the traditional single employer relationship, or even for multiple or multi employer work and that, like the construction industry, are likely to exclude their members. So ah, yeah, I mean, it's hard. It's hard to tell people because we're used to saying yes, I worked. And you know, the person that we're talking to believes us, because that's how our industry works. Proving that we have or the amount of days that we have, um, gets a little tricky.

 

Lawrence Lewis:

And then there's a whole other side of this, Christian. Which I'm more in touch with because I do a lot of experiential. You've done some experiential with me. But the live event industry.

 

Sister Christian:

Oh, yes, because everything cancelled everything. 

 

Lawrence Lewis:

Everything. Yep.

 

Sister Christian:

Sorry, Coachella.

 

Lawrence Lewis:

A lot of the vendors and talented artists that I know and work with, this is their time - South by southwest, Coachella. You know, all the things that have fallen in the in the wake has put people out of work for a very unknown length of time. There is a petition going around, asking the government for a federal aid package for the event industries on change.org. I’m going to put that link in the show notes as well. And here's what this one says. Currently, the live events and business meetings industry is in free fall, and headed toward a complete collapse with no end in sight. There are already strong ripples of this impact of the transportation and hospitality industry that rely on our industry, which have received media and government attention but no mention but the larger losses that are reaching into the billions and billions of dollars. And  continuing to climb by the minute in the live events and business meetings industry. So it's not directly related to film production, but there is a lot of crossover right now because of all the experiential work that's been happening, and those people need help as well.

 

Sister Christian:

Everybody needs help right now. I remember when I was filming at Bonnaroo last year. There was a man who lived in North Carolina, would drive over, and it was a shuttle van driver so that he could see all the music. They would stay like four to a hotel room and make the the wage. But he said he traveled around in many festivals, and that's what he did. So I could only imagine the people who do that. Making the lower end of the, you know, pay scale are devastated right now.

 

Lawrence Lewis:

Absolutely. So check out those petitions in our show notes if you feel inclined to sign them. Hopefully that is one small thing that can help us get a little bit of relief, too, to our community. 

 

Sister Christian: 

Yes. 

 

Lawrence Lewis:

Now, Christian, let's do our interview.

 

Sister Christian:

Oh, yes! And John Maher, one of my favorite people here in New York. 

 

Sister Christian:

Hey everyone! Today we're talking to John Maher. He is a New York City based location manager, has been doing so for about 25 plus years. So he's a member of Local 817, which is the Teamsters union and a member of the D. G. A. There was a special thing that happened, I would say about 10 years ago where all of you guys could get into the union as second ADs, right?

 

John Maher:

Yeah, I got in. I got in. And, um, 2006, it was still open for a while until it started to change when 817 start to make overtures. 

 

Sister Christian:

Exactly. 

 

John Maher:

You could get in just like any other second AD just by showing, uh, days, prep days and shoot days and, uh, which is for feature films, it’s still a DJ covered category. Um, 

 

Sister Christian:

And what for commercials?

 

John Maher:

For commercials, at that time, it was not a required, um, job that they had to fill. But if you were in eights into GA and into the guild, were hired to do a commercial and let know you're in the guilt, the company could either hire you or not.

 

Sister Christian:

Well, I remember there weren't very many of you guys, maybe three or four. 

 

John Maher:

It was more like 7, 6 or 7 or seven at that time.

 

Sister Christian:

Right, but still..

 

John Maher:

You know, I mean, not a lot, but, you know, we were once those of us that were in the Guild guys that were working a lot.

 

Sister Christian:

Well, in addition to those things, you also own home studios, which is 873 Broadway, for everybody out there for about 10 years now, with two studio spaces.

 

John Maher:

Yeah, well, we've been there since 2004. In 2014 he took over second space. Um, so we've been there…

 

Sister Christian:

17 years, so yeah. Wow. So what? The reason why we wanted to speak to John today is he as a location manager. Ah, in New York City. But also as a, um, you know, member of the guild. And 8 17 um, to get his perspective on what's kind of happening in New York right now. In addition to that, um, he has spoken to the mayor's office as recently is today to find out about permitting and such. 

 

Lawrence Lewis:

John, I would like to find out. How are you doing? How is you? How your family Are you home? Is everyone sequestered

 

John Maher:

So far, yeah, we are. My wife and I are staying home and going out as little as possible. I haven't ventured out to supermarkets or stores or anywhere in about three days. I'm going down to get mail, things like that. But I have no no reason to go out. So I haven't. Although today looks like it's going to be an errand day, so I probably will head out after you, um, on my bicycle.

 

Sister Christian:

And where are you at right now?

 

John Maher:

I'm in the Lower East Side, Monk. I'm sort of getting a better perspective through what I'm seeing at the studio than what I'm seeing or hearing through commercials and the DGA and  817. Um, I'm on, um, on the d g a message board here, the Google Group. I'm on the 817 Scout's message board, which is also includes the guys were doing TV and so on. And, you know, for the commercials, it just stopped very suddenly. Um, for the guys that are working in TV, on the streaming, you know, all the streaming shows that are shooting in New York, the Netflix and Universal and things like that. That was sort of a trickle where I think Netflix went first, and then Universal went second and buy a calm and so on and so on until pretty much all those guys. And right now there's like 500 scouts in 817 within the in that TV contract, which is separate from the commercial. 

 

Sister Christian:

Right.

 

John Maher:

It's just about 500 of those guys now there that are pretty much not working at all. The commercials, like I said, I had a couple of holes and things just dropped out pretty suddenly. 

What I saw at the studio, once things start to get a little crazy, we had one client that was concerned about her shoot. And they had some various concerns about getting equipment and this and that. So we let them load in early, like a week before their shoot. From the day that she loaded in, that the phone was just ringing in emails were coming and clients were like cancel, cancel, cancel, reschedule, cancel.

 

John Maher:

And to be clear, we're talking that that Monday was, uh, Monday, the 16th of the week.

 

John Maher:

It was 16th, like Friday. Well, Friday was like slow trick. Friday was like one client concern and another client saying, What about? And then when I came in Monday to meet the client that was concerned, it was just like phone call, email, phone call, email, like bang bang bang. By the end of Friday, we’d lost, almost every job had either canceled or postponed for two months for March in April, all of March, all of April. And it was sort of like the bigger clients with more money were initially more receptive to either hire cancellations these or things like that. And then, as the days went on, they called and started saying, Hey, wait a minute, wait a minute, that's not such a great deal. Let's revisit this and do more of postponements. And less your cancellation money, of course, our problem is the landlord's aren't giving any, the - What they're offering us is bubkiss. Me. Now they're saying, like, deferrals, right, which is absolutely brutal because what do you do then? In October, November?

 

Lawrence:

Yeah, when you owe six months of rent, all at once?

 

John Maher:

Exactly, exactly. Yeah, yeah. So I'm sort of seeing it from a different perspective with studio, and I'm seeing that it all came down so quickly. And the other side of this coin is you know, I'm being very optimistic with this and hoping that this is a short term thing. 

 

Lawrence:

Yeah. 

 

John Maher:

Um, you know, everybody now is also on the other side. Is quite everybody's like, you know, been saying, what dates can you give us from May 15th to June 30?

 

Lawrence:

Yes. And that's what I wanted to ask you is, looking forward, what is your calendar look like both for the studio and for location scouting? Do you have holds as a location scout looking forward. And it sounds like you've already got some holds for the studio. Looking forward, some optimistic holds.

 

John Maher:

The studio, yes, the optimistic holds for the studio are like deep, like deep, deep, deep, like overlapping days. And, you know, we have this one client who's got equipment in this to studio now. You know, not a lot of equipment. Got a couple of her pieces that, you know, you got the <inaudible>

 

Sister Christian:

got it. Sounds like she has dibs. Yeah,

 

John Maher:

She got dibs, for sure. As for a scouting. You know, I did have a couple of clients call last week as well, saying, Hey, we have an LA job. The directors in New York. This is in New York with talents in New York. Can we do it? And, you know, the mayor's office is still open. And at that point, I said, Yeah, if you guys want to come on, I could use the work. But that's all those those there was like only three calls. They have all kind of just disappeared. I haven't heard back, so I'm not. I'm not, you know

 

Lawrence:

Holding your breath.

 

John Maher:

Not holding my breath on that. And I don't have any scouting holds. But I have a feeling that just the production companies, you know, we all have a lot to deal with right now. And I figured that they probably have many balls in the air and the last thing that they're trying to figure out right now is booking a scout for June or something, but I think that if it happen, it'll happen, um and hopefully it is June or May, you know, May, yes please. <laughter> Um So hopefully you know, we're seeing people are being optimistic, and everybody is trying to get in early. I guess it. From the 15th of May through June, we have holds many deepest out. I mean, like, normally it's a one or two, maybe three, but we're going for five deep because everyone's blanket hold, too. It’s like, me I want three days, but give me the whole month. Give me every Wednesday-Friday, right? Sure, but

 

Sister Christian:

But when it comes down to it, it's Ah, well, hopefully you know how quickly it ended is how quickly it'll start back up.

 

John Maher:

Yeah, exactly. And you know, I listen to your previous cast and, you know, talking about 9 11 I was shooting on 9 11 and I, you know, endured that. And I was I was almost involved. Actually, I was so raw and it was so emotional and then to have people calling, like, two weeks later saying, Hey, we have to go reshoot that job. I was like, Are you kidding? Yeah, already. Yeah. Um, but that also spoke to the resiliency of, of New York, America, Like just the economy and the capitalism. Whatever you wanna call it. It's just like people they wanted to get back to work. And, um,

 

Sister Christian:

I think it gives people of purpose. 

 

John Maher:

Yeah, absolutely. 

 

Sister Christian:

Production, are our production people like, you know, we've all been freelance 20 plus years now, and it just this is our life style. It's how we, it’s our careers. It's how we work. But when we're not working, we're also trying to stay active and do things as well. 

 

John Maher:

Absolutely, absolutely. 

 

Sister Christian:

So I think that, um, it people wanted to get back to work and show, you know, everybody that we could and we were resilient. Back at 9-11, I feel like this is going to be. Hopefully, it's the same thing. It might be slightly harder because of government regulations. That's what we're trying to navigate right now. Like, have you heard anything at all from the D.G.A. or 8 17 or…

 

John Maher:

I heard a few different things? I mean, right now, I did actually speak to the D. G. A. On one of the three cool groups that I'm part of, there was a discussion on health benefits, how what's going to happen with people that, not at work? It's stopped. It's dependent on how many days you worked. 

 

Sister Christian:

Exactly. 

 

John Maher:

Are they going to change the number of days and etcetera, etcetera. And, you know, with the Guild, you know, the spectrum of the age group - my son Cody. You know, he’s also in the Guild now, he watched your training program, graduated. He, he's working to get to qualify. He just he just got in. He finished the program and he's working to qualify for the first time. And now with this work stoppage, that's you know that's not going to happen. Other members, young members that I know guys that are like Cody's age have gone through the program in the last three or four years. Some of these guys are now married and having babies and they're really, really concerned because they just got the insurance, and they don't want to fall off it. And then you have guys in the Guild that are much older and are using the health benefits because they’re, they’re older and they have more medical needs and so on. So right now, you know, the Guild is trying to work it out, how they proceed and what benefits the most members. What sort of the most painless way to go about this, you know, that you can't just have everybody come in or start paying? Yeah, no, you’re draining the system, there's nobody left, now nobody's going to get anything. So they’re, they have, they know that I got a direct call from them the other day and, um, I know that there were-

 

Sister Christian:

Right. I mean, is it? It's a fairness thing. It's a seniority thing. I'm sure it's also like a lifetime pay in versus not it's, uh, who's in the most need. It all has to be taken into consideration. And I don't know, I would hate to be the one who is in charge of deciding.

 

Lawrence:

Well again there. From what? You know what they said. They're going to do what will serve the most members the best way. I mean, you can't just, 

 

John Maher:

They could. If they lower thing, that amount of days to get in, it could lower that funds available. Uh, if they extend benefits. You know all of this, it's It's a tricky thing in it, but I I know, and I trust I trust them. I totally trust them. I know that they're well managed on. They're going to do the best they can. I know that my brothers and sisters in 8 17 because I'm again. I'm getting the D.G.A. plan. The guys in 8 17, MPH be It's a different thing and I'm not sure what's happening there right on there, pretty much in the same boat. All these are all these things are run by trustees, and the trustees have to decide what's best for the members. And, you know, you open the floodgates and then boom, there's no money left that that there is Ah, you know, a needle they need to thread. That's probably not going to please some people. And when

 

Sister Christian:

Well, when does 100% of things please 100% of the people. Okay, well, just as a as an antidote. So when you spoke to the mayor's office this morning, what did they say?

 

John Maher:

Yes, they, I was surprised because I had heard on the grapevine -

 

Sister Christian:

I was surprised because you texted me a little.

 

John Maher:

Yeah, I’d heard, because I had called for these jobs last week that they were still issuing permits. I had heard through the grapevine that they were going to start possibly working from home. The only problem is that the mayor's office they all work on What is it? Intranet? Rather Internet they don't have, Right. It's not an outside link, in other words, you can’t, You can't have a coordinator work from home and log in and process, they have to be in the office.

 

Sister Christian:

No, a lot of medical, a lot of city run things on that.

 

John Maher:

Right? Yes. Yeah. So I called him this morning to check in and, uh, they answered the phone, and I spoke to one of the coordinators, and they're still there, and they're still issuing permits.

 

Sister Christian:

They’re in the office?

 

John Maher:

Yeah, yeah they’re there.

 

Sister Christian:

interesting. And are they issuing permits?

 

John Maher:

They are, they are. And I did mention, You know what I've heard from the TV scouts. You know that the I know a lot of those guys I talked to a lot of them guys have worked with you for years and years, and all those shows have shut down. And they, she acknowledged that. But she did say that that was that was their decision to shut down. That wasn't a mandate from the city. The only mandate right now is no more than 50 people. So if you're on one of those TV shows, they're huge, you know.

 

Sister Christian:

They are. But I think I think that's an interesting point because part of what Lawrence and I was discussing yesterday, when it comes to force majeure, the reason why that I have been able to get those passed through was because the government shut down the city.

 

John Maher:

In L.A.

Sister Christian:

In New York, during a hurricane or something. That's because they're not shutting down because they're allowing permits. I wonder how that's going to work when it comes to cancellations. Lawrence?

 

Lawrence:

Right. That's the big question.

 

John Maher:

Well, some of these jobs, like one of the jobs that we had at the studio that was still talking about potentially doing this and discussions I had with them, these are guys that I know that you know. Yeah, they were sort of like a big Monday. They said, let's do a scout and I was supposed to go need them when my wife was not too happy about that. And then the producer called me. My wife says I can't leave either. So you, I gotta go if you won't be. Oh, they said, yeah, go do a Facetime video. And I said, uh, okay. And then the more I thought about it is ridiculous. Just this job isn't going to happen in a while. Why put myself my risk, my neighbors, and has to go up to the studio when this thing is, Yeah, and then, you know, it's like, this is the thing with the directors are in L. A. It's like, how are they going to get here? And the talent is a culinary personality, and I'm like, she's not going to put herself in front of a crew. And if we get the permit for 50 people and I have to have their studio staff, then that means they have 49 means 49 doesn't mean, like, over going to leave the PA’s in the truck, and we're going to have, they're all going to count, you know, they're all them yes, co-mingling and all of them are going to count. I just couldn't see how it could work.

 

Sister Christian:

No, I can see how ENG style shoots would work with people. And you know where the sounds person is also the boom. You know where there's people doubling up on things. But what I can't see a full on, you know, regular commercial, the way that we've filmed them in the past are able to move forward under 50 people.

 

Lawrence:

One thing that I saw in one of the many petitions that are going around town is that there are some positions that simply would go against the social distancing, like makeup, hair, wardrobe. For people who have to get in close and touch people that that's, you know, also another concern to think about in the in these shoes. Even if you could get the crew down small at some point, someone's going to have to put a brush on someone's face for makeup,

 

John Maher:

Right?

 

Sister Christian:

Touch their hair. Yeah,

 

John Maher:

Yeah, in this particular job, I and this is just my location manager thinking, not producer hat. You know, I could foresee you know something. Where day one they come in and they light and they smoke it out and they get it ready without talent. And that Day 2 is sort of a closed-set type environment. 

 

Sister Christian:

With just keys. 

 

John Maher:

Which it's like, you know something, like, when you've seen these things before, we're super close set where it's like talent. Yeah, yeah. Grip pushing the dollar, whatever. That's it for people. Maybe five people on set. I don't know. I'm not enough. That makes thing. That would be a reality, but..

 

Sister Christian:

It sure would be. I think people are going to start looking to be doing this. So any solutions are good or any, you know, suggestions or could be solutions.

 

Lawrence Lewis:

So, John, I wanted to ask you, you know what, what are you doing during this time? So you're kind of twofold. You've got the studio business and you've got your scouting business. Um, what are you doing during this downtime? As you said to you, you also worked through 911. What are you doing to stay active, stay positive and stay connected?

 

John Maher:

Yeah, I've talked to people. Really, just more of a social level. I mean, it's just I have so many concerns right now financially. Just living life as a normal person and the studio responsibilities. And, you know, my three kids that air ground in their own apartments and nobody is working. So, yeah, it's stay busy. I'm just doing like, everybody else is doing this, you know, this is this is today's entertainment. Uh, you know…

 

Sister Christian:

This is very helpful. Do you have any advise that you would give a freelancer of, uh, any freelance, about what's going on right now?

 

John Maher:

I just hunker down and it's going to lived and be over, You know, it will pass. We lived through 911, we lived through Sandy. Yeah, obviously, in those situations, you could you could sort of see the villain, whatever it would be. You could see it now. You can't. Yes, we're going to live through it. And believe me that this soon as this thing lifts, as soon as this thing settles down, it's going to get freaking crazy. It's going to It's really really, really it is going to come back. We'll be working again. I mean, it's a capitalistic society, and they're going to want to lay it on TV, whether it's Netflix, Amazon cookies whatever the hell, you’re advertising, it's going to be out there. 

 

Sister Christian:

Well, one more question before we let you go, what did you learn, if anything, from your experience of, uh, after 9 11?

 

John Maher:

But I think it was just that how quickly the city rebounded. You know, it was it was It was astounding. I mean, I really thought, you know this is it, man. This is it. I know, Um, you know, just from work standpoint, like, who was going to care about?

 

Sister Christian:

I remember

 

John Maher:

And that was sort of like, but now it was. It bounced back, and it rebounded. And I have full faith that it will. I totally trust the leadership in the unions. They're doing the best they can for their members. I feel bad for these young people that are starting out that are having a hard time making benefits, making ends meet. I really feel for them. But I feel confident that this thing is going to pass and we're going to bounce back and be just like we've always been stronger than ever.

 

Sister Christian:

I completely agree. Yes. Thank you so much for your time, John. We really appreciate it.

 

John Maher:

Thank you. Thank you for reaching out. If I hear any further updates in the mayor's office.

 

Sister Christian:

We Would love it. Because right now I feel like Lawrence and I were saying, I definitely feel a bit isolated right now. Even just speaking to people, even if it's been a little while. It feels nice to understand that we're all in this together.

 

Lawrence Lewis:

Thanks, John. Thanks for your time.

 

Sister Christian:

You so much for your time.

 

Lawrence Lewis:

All right. Very special thanks to John Maher for that interview. Very helpful and informative and optimism.

 

Sister Christian:

 

Yeah, the optimism that he has and the strong words about how we will get past this are very, um they're heartwarming for sure. They give us hope.

 

Lawrence Lewis:

and the optimism, the optimism of the people renting, putting his location on hold.

 

Sister Christian:

Yes,.

 

Lawrence Lewis:

In I just a couple months, that’s that's inspiring. So let's keep our fingers crossed that we'll be back to work soon.

 

Sister Christian:

Exactly. And we've asked John to update us, too. So maybe we'll have in about a week or two, like, we'll check in with John and see how the you know stage is holding up.

 

Lawrence Lewis:

So everybody stay safe and stay connected and also stay active.

 

Sister Christian:

Don't forget to wash your hands. And for the love of God, do not touch your face like I do.

 

Lawrence Lewis:

Do not touch your face. Be sure to send us your voice recordings or emails to producershappyhour@gmail.com.

 

Sister Christian:

It’s very important that we hear from you. We want to give you a voice in this.

 

Lawrence Lewis:

Absolutely. Christian, just for the record, how can people get a hold of you directly?

 

Sister Christian:

You can get me a www.sisterchristianproduces.com and Lawrence, how can people get a hold of you?

 

Lawrence Lewis:

They can get me at www.indelible-arts.com or my name www.lawrencetlewis.com. I have three websites www.lawrencetlewis.com or for my voice over work www.voiceoflawrence.com.

 

Sister Christian:

Perfect!

 

Lawrence Lewis:

Right, Christian. Thank you. Yeah.

 

Sister Christian:

Thank you all for listening. We really appreciate it.

 

Lawrence Lewis:

Yes. We'll talk to you tomorrow.