104 - Isolation & Your Voices

Lawrence Lewis:

Hey, everybody, this is Lawrence and I'm jumping in the front of this podcast because by the time we finished recording, some news came out that I wanted to share. One topic is that Netflix announced a $100 million fund to help film and TV industry workers. I don't have all the details yet. We're going to research that today and come back to you tomorrow with all the information. Also, it goes without saying, but we didn't specifically say it in this episode. Both New York City and Los Angeles have completely stopped issuing any filming permits. No filming activity is allowed to be happening in either, in either city. It goes without saying, due the new stay at home order. But I just wanted to make sure, everybody knew that up front. Will cover that in more detail in tomorrow's episode. Thank you. 

 

Lawrence Lewis:

Hello, everybody. This is Lawrence Lewis

 

Sister Christian:

And this is Sister Christian.

 

Lawrence Lewis:

Today is Friday, March 20th, 2020. We are two producers on opposite coasts who set out to make a light hearted podcast about what it means to be a good producer.

 

Sister Christian:

But things change very quickly, and now we're going to take this opportunity to reach out to our filmmaking community to see who's working, who's not working and what the future looks like for commercial production as, well as film and television. We need to hear your stories. I think they're very important right now. And I know that when I listen to some of your voice memos that you've been sending in, I can relate to what you're saying. And I think that's very important. Right now. We all need to understand that we're going through the same thing.

Lawrence Lewis:

Yes, So please send your questions or tell us what is happening with you and your work. Email us at producershappyhour@gmail.com or record a one minute voice memo and email it to that same address producershappyhour@gmail.com or just follow the instructions on our website,  www.producershappyhour.com.

 

Sister Christian:

So so Lawrence. 

 

Lawrence Lewis:

Okay.

 

Sister Christian:

I know that we check in with each other quite a bit, but I know that you've been in Joshua Tree, right? And haven't really been in Los Angeles to see the inner workings of how empty it is. Why don’t, I would like to check in to see how you're doing mentally.

 

Lawrence Lewis:

Well, Christian, I'm very fortunate that have ah, house out here in Joshua Tree and and was able to kind of escape and get away from it all. It's relaxing, its peaceful. I feel connected with nature. I do miss LA. I do miss my house in LA. So that's, you know, I feel disconnected. Obviously, I don't know how much more connected I would feel if I was there right now, because we can't do anything.

 

Sister Christian:

I think that everybody is ah, a kind word away from losing it. I know I am, and I tried to be the strong one around other people. But sometimes as producers, we are the strong one and who's strong for us?

 

Lawrence Lewis:

But I have to say, you know, Christian, like you said, today is a is a little more difficult day. I think you know, not that much different has happened, but obviously California and New York both went on safer at home mandates, which isn't much different than what I've been doing out here in Joshua Tree. But I feel like over the past few days I've been maintaining some positivity and keeping busy and working with you on this podcast. And I think today is…

 

Sister Christian:

I've been, uh I've definitely been struggling to try to be as productive as possible because I know that my personality lends to that while trying not to sink into more isolation and shutting everybody off. Because I think that the two things can are simultaneously ideas in my brain right now. And I I'm struggling with balancing the two notions the more the longer this is going on, and it's been a week, basically, the longer this is going, going to go on, the more isolated we're going to be feeling. Especially, if we're supposed to be alone in our houses.

 

Lawrence Lewis:

And I have now. Ah, you know, I woke up to the news of…

 

Sister Christian:

So did I!

 

Lawrence Lewis:

A friend who has symptoms and is in the hospital getting…

 

Sister Christian:

It just is. I try not, uh, yes, where we’re generally positive people, But I think, but I think it myself, like this is the first with its statistics that are going on right now. Like how many more? Yeah, and this person is in her thirties,

 

Lawrence Lewis:

So, you know it's not, it’s not directly around me, but no results are in yet. It takes three days, but it just really makes you realize how it really makes you realize how serious this situation is and how close to homes.

 

Sister Christian:

It’s only a person or two away.

 

Lawrence Lewis:

It's only a person or two away. Yeah, and I feel like, you know, Christian Way set out to make a nice Polish little podcast. But I think it's important that we share our feelings with each other and to our listeners because they're going through the same thing.

 

Sister Christian:

We're all going for this something and sometimes what I'm doing to cope, may somebody may realize that they need, they just needed to hear, an idea or. to understand that it's okay to feel like doing nothing in at all. That's okay, too. Completely fine

 

Lawrence Lewis:

It is! And a friend of mine that's here in our house with us that's been here the whole time, he said to me, just as I was walking out to come and record this episode, he said, this really feels like the world has just hit the pause or reset button to say, “Hey, slow down, we’re polluting too much. We're consuming too much, we're moving too fast. We're not connecting. It's time to just stop and remember what it is to be a human being and to be alive.”

 

Sister Christian:

that, uh, that sums it up, that that that sums it up quite nicely. Ah, you know, after you, after you get past the hardships that everyone's going through right now, again, I know that we try to be as positive as we possibly can for our own mental health. But also for those around us. Yeah, that's a little bit of you know, solace that we can take in these events. There may be more tears, guys. Just letting you know I'm ready to go for dears. Today. We're gonna feature some voice memos that you guys have sent into us. So here we go. This voicemail is from Jacob Patterson of Think Tank Gallery and The Great Company, both located in Los Angeles.

 

Jacob Patterson

Hey, Larry, it's Jacob Patterson from Think Tank Gallery Productions in Los Angeles and now the Great Company and Experiential Ad Agency in Los Angeles, which is the other place that I'm working all of the above and live events that think tank. It's not looking too hot. We're spending the majority of our time looking at what does it look like to close down. There's a good chance it's done. We had just got everything ready to ramp up a bunch of events and then the federal government shut them all down. We're not sure we could make it passed that. On the other side of things, a two great company were thinking of, what will the new normal look like when we're able to host events again? We'll see if we can keep working as clients are dropping us left and right. When we are ready to get back to work, if we still can. How can we bring people together once again. Thinking of those solutions is keeping us sane.

 

Lawrence Lewis:

I found Jacob in his Think Tank Gallery. Gosh, about maybe, I don't know, five or six years ago, I was producing still produce an immersive theater show called The Alone Experience, and I was looking for a venue and I came across his venue. It was in garment district in downtown. He opened up his doors to our crazy idea of what we were doing as immersive theater at the time before, we really even had the terminology of what to call it. He is a big supporter of artists. He's a big supporter of experiential work that we're all seeing blossom in the past couple of years. And he was doing what he can to help lead the charge and helping people with permitting live events and helping people execute live events. And he even grew into from think tank crew into this experiential company, the great company. Since he opened his doors to our crazy, immersive theater show. He's really taken off and been very successful in immersive theater, experiential activations for brands and all kinds of stuff. So I'm very honored that he sent in a voice memo, and I can hear the pain in his voice.

 

Sister Christian:

If I may. I thought that he was very… in his one minute in 17 seconds. I believe it was to me he sounded practical and a way of just listing off the things that he's going through. But at the end, when he said, when all this is over, I gotta figure out a way to bring people back together was what really hit home for me, the practicality of what he's going through, but also the urge and the need to continue doing what he's doing. The first little notes that I jotted down that came to mind for me was, I'm sure a lot of companies are going through the same assessments right now. What capital do you have in the bank? What overhead and stuff do you have? Sales, team marketing, the things that you have just running in the background constantly to get the next job. And then the fact that he's losing clients is just, it's heartbreaking, because what do you tell them?

 

Lawrence Lewis:

And I think you were saying this before we started recording Is that you and I? We're fixers, you're a fixer and you know, you hear something like that and you want to help fix it. But at this moment, we can't. But we feel for him, and we're honored that he shared his story with our listeners.

 

Sister Christian:

Thank you, Jacob. We have another voice memo from Latif Gibson. He's a video producer. He's also an adjunct professor at Norfolk State University and is the owner of LG Studios.

 

Latif Gibson:

Hello, I'm Latif. And the way that this pandemic has really affected me and my occupation is that I'm an educator. And the classes that I teach our hands on classes that I'm now forced to modify and make them online available. And so that right there is a task. And then also, I run my own company and within my company, based off not only myself, but also my clients have had to take precautions. And these precautions have now affected us in the way that we operate. Based off of some of the gigs that I was contracted to to service. They have gotten postponed along with I've had one major one to actually get canceled based off of this pandemic. So this this is really affecting individuals in multiple ways. Now, at the end of the day, I do understand that we have to be safe. But again, this pandemic is really a life changer.

 

Sister Christian:

Yes, life changer. The first thing that I thought of was the sheer amount of work that he's had to do since Monday.

 

Lawrence Lewis:

Oh, my gosh. Yeah, I can imagine. Like you and I are, we're kind of came to a halt your project, but everything just stopped. Books are clean, Um and so we just had to kind of sit tight, whereas somebody like him an educator more important for than ever for him to kind of keep working. In the work, as you were saying since Monday to shift his whole process around is staggering.

 

Sister Christian:

Because it sounds like he was hands on in a classroom. Ah, teaching film just to convert all of that to the medium that we're on right now, our computers seems like he's gonna have to do a lot of instructional videos. He's going, you know, it's just it feels like it's going to be a lot of work to switch over, but also to switch over right away, us just like our entire education system, how to do, Sorry, Sister is a teacher and she's still in the middle of converting all of her assignments ends, you know, her curriculum basically to online, and a lot of the kids in her classrooms don't have access to the internet because she works in the Bronx.

 

Lawrence Lewis:

Right. Hat's off to all the health care workers and educators out there that are still doing what they do and doing it any way.

 

Sister Christian:

And I can also relate to the postponements and the, uh, cancellations, too. It's just it's happening everywhere and because of uncertainty. So, uh, thank you for calling in, Latif. We really appreciate your insight right now.

 

Lawrence Lewis:

Yes. Thank you. Okay, our next voice memo. It's actually as a question. And this one comes to us from Maya Yeirdo, who is a New York based production manager. We actually shot it out to her in Episode 1, back when everything was all sunny. And Christian….

 

Sister Christian:

She’s a New York based production manager. However, she was raised by a producer. So I feel like often when I work with some film children, let's call them of film families, especially producer. So differently than the rest of us where in a sense, that they’re comfortable around client. They're pretty fair with their decisions. They're always punctual, and so they know their way around a budget. So yeah, she's tops. 

 

Maya:

Hey, there. I’m Maya, I’m a PM based in New York. I live out in Brooklyn. Um, I actually met Christian last year on a job and we started working together, and that's been wonderful. Um, I wanted to talk about a point you guys touched on in your last episode regarding cancellation fees. The week of March 9th, I scouted out of hospital. Um, the scout was my first day on the job, so they had more or less mapped out their shooting locations beforehand with the hospital. Ah, we were brought up to the fourth floor, which is where one of her shots are, and told that this will also be the floor that the whole quarantine patients for Corona virus if they were to bring any in. And it almost seemed like they were insinuating that we would continue shooting even if there were such case to be in the hospital. So there was ultimately some back and forth until they decided to postpone the job. Um, this was a job where the production company was working directly with the clients’ marketing arm and therefore communicating directly with the client. We discussed between the producer and I what the appropriate method of going about kill fees were, um, and I ended up submitting payroll for everyone's kill fee, but I guess the big question is, how do you navigate these newer and more frequently occurring relationships where you are working directly with the client? They might not be versed in kill fees. And a lot of what, uh, typically an agency handles communication for them in if it were to happen. Um, what about this particular circumstance when the client may want to redirect that kill fee money to something else? Especially in this case, it's a hospital. It's a totally unexpected and kind of coincidental thing that had happened all at the same time. I think it's ah, hard line to navigate. And I wanted to get your viewpoints more on the matter of how you might handle that situation. Thanks. And stay safe, You guys.

 

Lawrence Lewis:

Thank you, Maya. Good question, Christian. Do you wanna take the lead? And I got a couple things to contribute.

 

Sister Christian:

Yeah. So first, I'd like to say this one's tough, since we're constantly balancing client and company. We’re the good or the middle man. Let's call it, and we're almost negotiating constantly between clients and company, depending on the size of the company. I do know that the larger companies, the ones that we all know definitely have a structure in place for this type of thing. But the smaller companies or post house, let's say who, um, film is well, those companies don't always have a tried and true, you know, set stead of, um, cancellation policy. It's per job. And I also know that a lot of us don't have never been on a job that has canceled. Its’ all always a myth you heard about like one time in 2005 I was on a Burger King commercial that talent blah, blah, blah, and we all got paid 11 days, and it's like what I know. So did touch on this a little earlier today with union rules are I do think that those don't apply when you are in the situation that Maya has described. And if it's after the fact, I think that you negotiate for as much as you possibly can with an understanding that even though our community, our entire community, is based on your books, that means you're on my job and you're getting paid, balance that with the understanding that this happened to everybody. It's everybody's bottom line right now and we are individuals and we are small companies and it's it's happening to everybody at the same time

 

Lawrence Lewis:

in these kind of situations, whenever I do brand direct jobs, I think a big understanding that everyone has to take on is that you are fulfilling two roles. You're fulfilling the role of production exactly. Also fulfilling the role of the agency. And the big function of the agency is to walk brands through the process of creating media for advertising or whatever the situation is because that's not their specialty. So they're looking to an ad agency to be the experts and guide them. It shouldn't be overlooked when you do brand direct work as a production company because that guidance is very important specifically for times like these. So I think what I would do in this situation is, even if it's a small company in there, you thought the AICP, would share the AICP guidelines with the client because those are out there in the world as kind of a set standard. You're not contractually obligated to abide by them, so you know, they can say no, but I would say this is the industry standard and you can back it up with all the reasons. You know, because PAs make $250 a day. How many days a month do they work on average, 5, 10? You know, what's the cost of living for a PA? And how does that equate with what their rate is and why those days are so precious to them? Every single day of PA books is precious to them, and when they get a string of 5, 6 days, they turn out other work. It's a big risk for them. It's a big hit for them. When these kind of cancellations happen. We’re gonna put the AICP guidelines in our show notes. It spells out very, very simply, but that's that's a good starting point. Informed the agency, share them the information and guide them through the process and tell them what is industry standards. And then second thing is that she handed out is you know, what do you do with the client wants to redirect the cancellation fees to somewhere else, like the hospital that they were shooting in or something to that effect. I'm not sure if she means, you know, sending that money to social, you know, benefit program or charity or what she was referring to in there. But if there is a question, I think what you need to do is separate the hard costs from the profit and be fully transparent and say, look, these are their hard costs. These are the numbers we owe to our crew to be fair to them, especially in this difficult time and here's the profit and then have a discussion internally. Is there a certain amount of that profit that the company is comfortable donating to the hospital that they were going to shoot at or something to that effect? That way, you could make sure your hard cost are covered, and you're not going into your own pocket. And then if there is some goodwill that the client wants to see out of the money than you know, you guys could discuss, the company could discuss that and make a decision.

 

Sister Christian:

I think that's billions because in a negotiation both sides have to be willing to give up something. Unfortunately, that's what negotiation is. And you're when your contract doesn't wait, address it the way that it should. You know, I also have a prediction where contracts coming out of this whole thing are going to read completely differently when it comes to cancellations. I think a huge lesson is learned. A handshake deal…

 

Lawrence Lewis:

Oh yes, a hundred percent. 

 

Sister Christian:

Yeah, we all want to do the right thing, but are learning that not everybody can adhere to what are not. Everybody's definition of what the right thing is is the same.

 

Lawrence Lewis:

Hey, Christian, as we've been talking, I just got an email from Ad Age and it's got some information here that I think we should share. Obviously, they're trying to keep everybody informed of the Corona virus and how it's affecting our industry and what they say here that I'm reading this from the email I just got 

“As a public service, we have lifted the Paywall on our daily digital coverage of the Corona virus, and we will continue to allow free access for the foreseeable future. We remain committed to expanding our communication with you as events play out with a range of offerings updated in real time.”  And so here, a couple of there offerings. “In addition to reporting individual news stories as they break, we have to live blog's running simultaneously, one track marketers response to the virus, and the other follows agency's efforts.”

 

Sister Christian:

Oh, that’s, I'm sorry. That's fantastic, because I wanna yeah, like somebody's gonna super ideas shortly. It really is. I don't know who that's going to get us, you know, like the the wheels starting to turn for us.

 

Lawrence Lewis:

Exactly. I'm gonna put both of these logs in our show notes, links to the blogs in our show notes. And in the early dizzy outbreak, they also launched the Corona virus industry event tracker to provide real time updates, including postponements, cancellations, rescheduled dates and other useful information for a comprehensive list of industry events. They go on to say, as we know, any events that haven't been canceled already have been moved several months into the future. 

 

Sister Christian:

Thank you. 

 

Lawrence Lewis:

Obviously, we know. Okay, well, thanks to ad age, that's nice. 

 

Sister Christian:

That's fantastic. I'm, uh that's fantastic. I'm very curious to see what the ad agencies, right. They're supposed to come up with ideas. I'm very excited.

 

Lawrence Lewis:

So let's just have a few more news updates to share. I'm sure everybody knows about them, but both New York and California issued safer at home orders,

 

Sister Christian:

If if not to make us feel more isolated now we have to stay home.

 

Lawrence Lewis:

Um, so Gavin Newsom, yesterday, issued the first statewide, I didn’t realize this when it happened. The first statewide order in the country for all 40 million Californians to stay at home. I'm reading from gov.ca.gov. I'm gonna put the link to his order in the show, notes his actual order. It's a pdf of the actual order that he signed. But basically to protect public health. I, as state public health officer and Director of the California Department of Public Health order all individuals living in the state of California to stay home or at their place of residence except as needed to maintain continuity of operations of the federal critical infrastructure sectors. So that means in layman's term are 16 critical infrastructure sectors that remain open and operational. These were the only people that are allowed to go to work. I mean, unless you work from home. So in California, these are the chemical sector, commercial facility sector communications, critical manufacturing cities…

 

Sister Christian:

That makes sense. 

 

Lawrence Lewis:

emergency services, energy, financial services, food and agriculture, government facilities, health care and public health sector information technology, nuclear reactors, materials and waste transportation system. Yeah, keep them. Keep them at work, please. Water and wastewater, second systems sector. So those are the only people that are allowed to, like go and function at a place of business. Obviously, if you run a business from home, you're one of the fortunate ones. You can do whatever you want. Your private home. Obviously, that's the plan right now. And one thing you know the governor hears was reach up with this, but actually, our city here study has just watching. 

 

Sister Christian: 

I have to say that I'm like, yeah, he's He's great.

 

Lawrence Lewis:

Oh, my gosh, I don't want to get political, but in our administration, I think everybody is looking for a little bit of 

 

Sister Christian:

Honesty?

 

Lawrence Lewis:

warmth and leadership. I was gonna say warm in leadership and compassion and action, like the way Mr. Garcetti is communicating to us is so reassuring. I encourage everybody in the state of California and beyond to go to YouTube. Just Google search Eric Garcetti. He's doing a daily live YouTube video where he's taking questions from reporters and giving everybody updates. And it's it's It's comforting to hear leadership, which I sounds ridiculous to say, but I feel like it's we've been lacking it for a little while.

 

Sister Christian:

It's not ridiculous. For those of you who know us or don't know us, I would probably consider myself the more confrontational of the two of us. And I will say that I've been craving honesty. Just give me the fucking facts and I will be able to take, understand and then form a plan. But when I'm not getting the entire story or the facts…

 

Lawrence Lewis:

Exactly.

 

Sister Christian: 

I don't know quite what to do. And that is the scariest thing in the world for me. So not getting political, just more more about just honesty. Just tell me what's happening.

 

Lawrence Lewis:

I think as producers, that's how you and I function, Christian. We take out the emotion out of what we do. We get the facts. Here's the fax. Here's how we can make this shoot happen. Here's how we do this. Here's how we do that. Let's make a plan based on these facts or guidelines or whatever. So when we're in this kind of topsy turvy situation where information is an accurate or consistent, it's a little unnerving for for us.

 

Sister Christian:

It is because I'm finding facts in multiple different places and putting them in a basket and then understanding them, right? Instead of one source that I can get things from. And I know that we should be multiple sources guys, especially the last, you know, five years or so, let's call it. But, uh, this is becoming a situation where we're almost all out for ourselves. Like, okay, so Governor Cuomo here in New York State has also asked for people to stay home. There are,  we can, and we will include this link and are shown notes as well. Basically, here was a statement. It's the strictest order yet from the governor of New York. Cuomo has mandated that everyone in the state remain indoors to the greatest extent. Unless they're performing, is central functions like providing food, utilities and healthcare. These provisions will be enforced. They're not helpful hints, Cuomo said. They take effect on Sunday night. Oh, so he's also going good news, though, he's also going to be halting all evictions in the state for 90 days. So we were sheltering in place. I guess that isn't even a good word for it. We, I have been, I haven't left the house since I got home. Since I flew home on Tuesday, it's been okay. I've been fine, plenty to do here, wrapping and, you know, like, you know, talking to you guys, but also to, um, it's going to get old. I know that because I can't go out now. And I can't go across the street to have to play pinball and have a beer, right? So trying to find other things to do is going to be top of my list very shortly. Things I could do to help.

 

Lawrence Lewis:

And it is important for us to clarify to everyone listening Christian, because I know there's a lot of verbiage is going around like shelter in place or locked down, or, you know, this new one safer at home. What I heard from Eric Garcetti was that even even the phrase sheltered home is incorrect from what's being asked. Yeah, shelter. 

Sister Christian:

It means nuclear. 

 

Lawrence Lewis:

However, you are exact. Stay there. You like a nuclear bomb or major earthquake. Yeah, so…

 

Sister Christian:

it's not martial law

 

Lawrence Lewis:

And locked down. Same thing. This is not a lock down. I think it's important for everybody to know that it's not martial law. You're allowed to leave your house to go for a walk. You're allowed to go to the park. All the all the national parks are open. We just went into Joshua Tree yesterday. There's no one at the booth. You could just drive in and it's encouraged. But as long as he remains six feet away from people.

 

Sister Christian:

All fees were waved in New York state, too for all parks. So, yes, you can definitely be in your car because, yes…

 

Lawrence Lewis:

That’s great! Last night we went to a drive in a movie theater here in 29 Palms. And it was amazing, and it was a lot of fun. I haven't been to a drive in theater since I think I was like 5 we had a great time.

 

Sister Christian:

We have an icicle.

 

Lawrence Lewis:

Really?

 

Sister Christian:

Yeah.

 

Lawrence Lewis:

It felt safe and it was felt like we were getting out of the house and doing something. Um and we had a good time. So it was nice. However, that edict came down, the mandate came down and when we talked to one of the workers there, he's like, yeah, tonight's our last night. We have to shut down. So even that is gone for now. But hopefully they will be back when things returned to normal. Christian, there is one more thing I want to chat about real quick. I know we're going a little long today, but..

 

Sister Christian:

I have one more thing to so let's do.

 

Lawrence Lewis:

Oh, good. Okay, so there's actually two more things. The freelancers union. Now I have to admit I'm not terribly familiar with the freelancers union or or what they dio, um I mean, it's in their title, but, uh, but I don't know their inner workings, however, in a blogger written by Rafael Espinal, who is the president and executive director of the Freelancers Union, he wrote this: Today, I sent a letter to New York Governor Andrew Cuomo, New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio and New York state and city elected officials to outline the stakes were freelancers in this unprecedented moment in our history. And he goes on to say any and all financial safety nets that are implemented in this moment of economic crisis must include freelancers. Yes, because as we were talking, you know, we don't have this. We don't have documented consistent work, which a lot of the social benefit programs need. And so even my friend of mine's just trying to get unemployment. And because, you know, he works a day here a day here, it's It's challenging. So he goes on to say, In my letter, he stated a four point plan to support independent workers. One, establish a temporary emergency measure to provide zero interest loans to New York's small businesses, including freelancers. Historically, we are all our own small business. Two, to ensure that freelancers have access to all emergency paid sick leave plans and family medical leave plans, regardless of their employment status, which, as I said, that's important because we don't have a consistent employment. We look like hobos on paper.

 

 

Sister Christian:

And right now…

 

Lawrence Lewis:

And right now, yes, three established disaster unemployment assistance programs that include all working freelancers and self employed workers who have lost time due to the impacts of Covid19. Number 4,  institute tax breaks and deferments of tax payments for self employed individuals. So I'm gonna put a link to this blog post in the show notes, because he's got a call to action in here to get involved in the fight for freelancers’ right. Contact your local representatives and share these demands. Here is a sample script for you to use, and he puts a sample script in there so you can look up at your own state officials and send this pre written letter to them. When you got nothing else to do guys, I think it's important that we all take the time and send this out.

 

Sister Christian:

Oh yeah, I know that the freelancers union is pretty big here in New York. I remember checking into it years and years and years ago, right as copros was starting, and thought I would throw my eggs in the copros basket for PH P. But I do think that it is a good option, and I also feel very strongly that, you know, a lot of us are incorporated or have small businesses in order to maintain our, you know, write offs and expenses, it's impossible to show income to somebody in a standard way. So this is amazing. Yeah, that somebody's laid it out so succinctly for us. So, Lawrence, I have a quick thing that my doctor sent me earlier today, and this is for anybody out there who would be interested in in New York in helping out, in a greater sense, to get out of your house. Here we go. So, you conjoin the Medical Reserve Corp. The New York City Medical Reserve Corp can mobilize volunteers for nonemergency public health or for community resilience activities and rapidly deploy volunteers for emergency response operations. The MRC can recruit and select volunteers for assignments based on many criteria, such as profession, languages spoken and home address. To become a member of the MRC, follow these instructions which will, you know, put the link into our website. Importantly, though this is for people with no medical training who are willing to help. Okay, I know it's kind of exciting because, I mean, you could you can volunteer for who knows what. I mean, were You know, I'm sure that it's going to be taken seriously and very safely, but it could. I'm absolutely, the the possibilities are endless in my brain right now of what this means.

 

Lawrence Lewis:

Well, all right. Thank you for sure. Yeah, I have to really light hearted things I'm gonna include in the show notes as well. So, Broadway, New York City's Broadway Ah, they are offering some musicals and plays for free for the next seven days. Um or actually, it's a seven day free trial. Broadway live. Go to www.broadwayhd.com. I'm gonna put that link in the show notes something for you guys to do if you want to see Broadway musical or play tonight. Also, there is digital drag show happening tonight.

 

Sister Christian:

What?

 

Lawrence Lewis:

A bunch of, uh, known queens are doing a digital drag show tonight where you can tip them digitally dollars. And it's being done on twitch TV, which is a platform I haven't used before, but mostly for gamers.

 

Sister Christian:

Yeah, we have twitch. 

 

Lawrence Lewis:

Yeah, exactly. Um, 

 

Sister Christian:

I'm gonna be dialing that up.

 

Lawrence Lewis:

It's exciting, and I'm gonna put that link in the show notes as well something fun to do to get your mind off all this craziness. In the meantime, everybody thank you for listening. Stay safe, stay connected and stay active.

 

Sister Christian:

And don't forget to wash your hands. And for the love of God, do not touch your face.

 

Lawrence Lewis:

Please send us your voice recordings or your e mails. Tell us your stories. We really need to hear them. We all need to stay connected. Email us producershappyhour@gmail.com. Um, Christian, for whatever it's worth, how do people get a hold of you directly if they want to talk to you?

 

Sister Christian:

You can head on over to www.sisterchristianproduces.com and Lawrence, how can we get a hold of you?

 

Lawrence Lewis:

You can reach me at www.lawrencetlewis.com or for my voice over work, which I can do safely from home, www.voiceoflawrence.com

 

Sister Christian:

I think we should tackle animation and what's, Ah, work. Moving forward. Like what we see as bits of where people are shifting to possibly ever. If we're ready, if we're ready. Yeah, yeah. 

 

Lawrence Lewis: 

All right, bye, Christian. 

 

Sister Christian:

Okay. Thank you so much, Lawrence.

 

Lawrence Lewis:

Yeah, thanks everyone for listening, and we'll talk to you tomorrow.