107 - Cliff Zellman & Tips for Voice Actors

Lawrence Lewis:

Hello, This is Lawrence Lewis.

 

Sister Christian:

And this is Sister Christian.

 

Lawrence Lewis:

Today is Tuesday, March 24th, 2020. This is the Producers Happy Hour, two producers on opposite coasts, reaching out to our filmmaking and live event community to hear your stories about how this pandemic has affected your lives and your work.

 

Sister Christian:

We want to hear your stories. We need to hear your stories. We're finding that they're helping us too, 

 

Lawrence Lewis:

Yeah.

Sister Christian:

And I know that they're helping, you know. Ah, you guys out there because we're you know we're getting the feedback. So, let's keep it up. Keep on. Let us know how you're doing.

 

Lawrence Lewis:

Please send us your questions or tell us your stories. Tell us what is happening with you and your work. You can email us at producershappyhour@gmail.com, or better yet, record a one minute voice memo and email into at same address producershappyhour@gmail.com, or just follow the instructions on our website at www.producershappyhour.com and Christian, today we are chatting with Cliff Zelman, He has an interesting perspective. He has been in the production industry for over 35 years, he started in music as an audio engineer and moved into audio for animation and then advertising. And now he works very closely with actors, specifically voice actors for commercials. 

 

Sister Christian:

I'm excited about this one because I think that he's going to be able to help a lot of people with what they could be doing now just in preparation for when the work starts back up.

 

Lawrence Lewis:

And he has a very positive take on what lies ahead of us. So it was nice for me, to listen to him, uh, kind of be positive and, uh, and have some foresight into what's what's down the road for us. So I look forward to sharing it with you guys. Okay Christian, Yesterday's podcast was a little long. I don't know. I don't know what our listeners think. If anybody wants to give us any feedback, we'd be happy to hear it. But, I think maybe let's tighten it up. And let's just dive into some voice memos today and get to the interview. What do you think?

 

Sister Christian:

I think that sounds great. Um, but first, uh, I want to check in with you. How you doing today?

 

Lawrence Lewis:

I'm good. I'm still in Los Angeles. Ah, probably going to head back to Joshua Tree ah, this afternoon. 

 

Sister Christian:

Oh, that was quick.

 

Lawrence Lewis:

Yeah, I, I just I kind want to get out. I'm again. I don't want to be an alarmist. I'm just worried that once people run out of money for not working, there, there's a potential of some social unrest.

 

Sister Christian:

I agree with that. And I think that a lot of us are closer to paycheck to paycheck than what we would like to think about each other. Um, you can look put together on the outside and on the inside, know that it's just a job away.

Lawrence Lewis:

It's just a job away,

 

Sister Christian:

So…

 

Lawrence Lewis:

We, Here in L. A. We've been one week and one week and two days on lockdowns. That means a lot of people have missed a week of work and that for some people can sink em.

Sister Christian:

Yes, I mean, today. Ah, Governor Cuomo came out and said something. Ah, You know, his news conferences are always refreshing because they're so ah, blunt, which my southern and my family would call that being rude (laugh). And I like blunt honesty, which, you know, speaks to my heart and, um, yeah, he said a lot of things that were that, um were very honest, and I encourage everybody to listen to it if you haven't heard it yet. Um, it just seems that the optimism, as we should all have of these being done sooner than later, should be absolutely tempered with reality.

 

Lawrence Lewis:

Hmm, and what was the tone of his, His press conference.

 

Sister Christian:

Very concerned about the lack of help that we need in New York and how it's 10 times worse here than it is anywhere else in the country. 

 

Lawrence Lewis:

Yeah.

 

Sister Christian:

And how, there's still some people out there who don't understand that we're all in this together. 

Lawrence Lewis:

Yeah.

Sister Christian:

And those people are being selfish, and there is some judgment behind that comment. 

 

Lawrence Lewis:

Yes. 

 

Sister Christian:

Yeah.

 

Lawrence Lewis:

That makes sense. How, um how are you? How does it make you feel? How are you feeling?

 

Sister Christian:

Well, I mean, I understand there's nothing that I can personally do right now to help it. So I take the knowledge and I, I'm trying. I'm trying to find something. 

 

Lawrence Lewis:

Well, here there is. There is. I'm going to break in because it's a message. We should send everybody there is something you can do and you're doing it. You're staying home.

 

Sister Christian:

Oh yes, nothing that I can do except for stay home. 

 

Lawrence Lewis:

Yes. 

 

Sister Christian:

Yes. Agreed. I didn't tell you this on Sunday. We had a day off. So on Sunday, I did help out some friends who were doing cat rescues by delivering rescued cats from one place to inform them out. Basically,

 

Lawrence Lewis:

Really. 

 

Sister Christian:

In this a bunch of different places within Brooklyn. Yup. 

 

Lawrence Lewis:

That’s awesome.

 

Sister Christian:

Ah, didn't you know, leave the car, leave the cat on the steps and let the person know,  in a cage. Of course, in a carrier, You're free! No, In a carrier and the, you know, people would come out. They grab, um new foster cat. And it was great. So I do think that part of what Cliff was saying in his interview of like having Ah, an animal I think will help a lot of people. So if anybody's interested in adopting some cats, I can hook you up. 

 

Lawrence Lewis:

Wow. 

 

Sister Christian:

So that's one thing. And the other thing is, I'm still I think I have a script finally to do stop-animation project that I'm gearing up for which I'm very excited about.

 

Lawrence Lewis:

That is exciting. I can't wait to see it.

 

 

Sister Christian:

I know, I know, I know. And so now I'm, like, thinking to myself, Like, Do I reach out  to Brad Burke and ask him about, Can I borrow some lights? And if I can and how do I get them here and so, What I aim them at? A lot that goes into this project. And I’m getting on my phone and I I know like there's somebody out there have old DSLR, they want to they want to loan me and I don't I don't know. I need help with this guy.

 

Lawrence Lewis:

In a kind of points to what Cliff we talked about with Cliff. It's like, now maybe now the time to learn a new skill, learning new program. Learn how to edit, learn how to, you know, sound engineer whatever, so that's what you're doing.

 

Sister Christian:

Yes, I believe. Yes, I, I definitely have self taught in final cut. 

Lawrence Lewis:

 

Yeah.

Sister Christian: 

So I could probably do that, but laying in the audio and so I have no idea. So we'll see what happens.

 

Lawrence Lewis:

You'll figure it out. You're a smart cookie. 

 

Sister Christian:

I’ll just play the track on my phone into Yeah, we'll figure it out.

 

Lawrence Lewis:

I have to admit, I did not accomplish our own subscription challenge.

 

Sister Christian:

Oh, yes. I've thought of 14 other things to do. Besides,

 

Lawrence Lewis:

I know me too. So, we still challenge everyone out there to do it. We're going to do it. Hopefully sometime this week. Let's just say this week,

 

Sister Christian:

Okay. Do we want to, do we want to set an arbitrary deadline that we can survive still do.

 

Lawrence Lewis:

Friday.

 

Sister Christian:

Cram.  Fine. Friday by one eastern.

 

Lawrence Lewis:

Yes exactly. Yeah.

 

Sister Christian:

 Yeye yeah.  Okay, I'm not looking forward to that, but I will do it.

 

Lawrence Lewis:

Anything else you want to cover before we dive into some voice memos?

 

Sister Christian:

I don't think so. I'd love to hear what people are saying so that I'm excited about.

 

Lawrence Lewis:

Okay, great. Well, this come one comes from Greg Caruso, who is a production supervisor. Let's take a listen.

 

Greg Caruso:

Hello, Greg Caruso here. I think it's pretty hard to encapsulate in just a minute what's going on in the world. Um, especially our industry my life in general. Um, our industry Is that a standstill now. And, ah, who knows what's going to happen. I think I feel the worst for all the P.A.s out there, lower, lower lower rung folks who, uh, you know we're living paycheck to paycheck. Um, you know, thankfully, I've had a good year and ah facing some cancellation fees coming my way, which is nice waiting on when that's going to be dished out to us. Um, trying to stay hopeful every day, Uh, that thing will turn around and things will get better. We, my wife and I have been working out running in the mornings and the, you know, taking her car's out of the garage and turning it into a makeshift gym in the afternoon. Um, most difficult thing about all this for us, I think, is making sure children are staying on schedule. Um, you know, giving them ideas on what to learn because LA USDA isn't giving them, you know, full blown. Um, you know, uh, learning options. You know, they're not, like private schools that have, like, zoom every class. Um, yeah. You know, just trying to go day by day, you know, make sure we're staying on a budget. Make sure that food is ah, picked up. Um, you know, every week, fresh stuff, at least. Um, yeah, you know, just living it day by day. 

 

Sister Christian:

Thank you, Greg. Day by day. 

 

Lawrence Lewis:

Day by day.

 

Sister Christian:

Because yeah, I mean to think I mean, as much as we like to think about and figure out what the plan is, um, we don't have one. 

 

Lawrence Lewis:

No.

 

Sister Christian:

And it can be overwhelming.

 

Lawrence Lewis:

Yeah, I think we touched on this yesterday. Like, you know, looking at our calendars for freelancers like us to have a completely empty calendar is a bit unnerving.

 

Sister Christian:

Hasn't happened in a while, So, um, that's the (giggling) unnerving part. And but also to like I mean, I don't have children, right? So 

 

Lawrence Lewis:

I know, I was just going to bring that up. Hats off to the to the parents.

 

Sister Christian:

Like the coming teachers in a week

 

Lawrence Lewis:

Even imagine how people are getting by with 1,2,3 kids at home inside.

 

Sister Christian:

And if LA used he is not giving them a curriculum or some sort of at home study plan. And it's up to the parents, too. Hang it all. It's, its mind boggling.

 

Lawrence Lewis:

Greg, Thank you so much for sending that in. Greg and I have worked together before. Uh, he's a great production supervisor and Well, we're wishing you the best, Greg.

 

Sister Christian:

Okay, One more voice memo today. This one is from Katie Morgan, who is the director of creative video at University of San Francisco Athletics. Let's listen. 

 

Katie Morgan:

Hi, everyone. My name is Katie Morgan. I am currently living in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Part of my role is I'm in charge of feature content as well as overseeing livestreaming. One of the things that has been very devastating for myself and for others is that our livelihood and everything that we do revolving around work is sports. I still produce the Olympics. You know, the Olympics. I just found out or postponed to May 2021. So my, you know, my heart goes out for my freelance friends who rely on those jobs coming in. You know, the biggest challenge for me as I still have a job is just trying to produce content when there are no athletes at the university. Honor, the seniors that lost their season. Our biggest key of being relevant and successful this season and getting content out is using the iPhone. I've had all the seniors record on their iPhone. What would they tell their freshman self and basically just talking about their season being cut short. The advice that I would give industry professionals, especially those in college athletics is to think outside the box. Be creative. Use the technology that we have. Don't underestimate the student athletes. They're hurting too. They're still in shock. They're still grieving. You know, we can still tell their stories, and we can still be relevant in the time of this crisis. I'm a little devastated about the Olympics. I was really looking forward to them because A, I love the Olympics. I've done him for 20 years now, but also, that was a huge source of income for me that I desperately needed. So Okay, I don't get to do it, But this is a wonderful opportunity to get online and to improve your craft, anything that you can do to get a different perspective, to make yourself a better field producer, editor, interviewer. Ah, whatever it may be. Anyway, I wish you all the best. I think if we stand together, we're all going to get through this.

 

Lawrence Lewis:

Thank you, Katie.

 

Sister Christian:

Thank you, Katie. I mean, that was first of all, I'm so, uh, really moved by your, um but how much you're giving your,

 

Lawrence Lewis:

Yeah.

 

Sister Christian:

the students.

 

Lawrence Lewis:

Your commitment to these students is is very, very hard

 

Sister Christian:

Yeah, you can You can absolutely feel it pretty deep. So, um, thank you for sharing that with us. And also to I think that's great advice, Lawrence. Some taking online class.

 

Lawrence Lewis:

Yeah. 

 

Sister Christian:

Figure and same way from what Cliff said earlier to, like, maybe now is the time that if you always thought you wanted to farm beats. May is the time you grab some beats.

 

Lawrence Lewis:

Yeah. 

 

Sister Christian:

May this time you grab some beats.

 

Lawrence Lewis:

Live. Live your best life now or learn, learn how to live your best life when we're allowed to go outside. Um, thank you, Katie. That was That was that was That was excellent. Much appreciated. Yes. Hey, Christian, before we get too close interview, I want to mention again the three links on our website producers. Happy hour dot com.

 

Sister Christian:

Yes, two of them are petitions to implore the government to include film industry and event industry cruise in financial relief packages.

 

Lawrence Lewis:

And the 3rd one is a form letter for you to send to your state officials asking them to include freelancers in financial assistance programs which were often left out of because of our You know, Cookie way of working that doesn't fall under any sort of standard method of tracking income.

 

Sister Christian:

Exactly. So get to work people. It'll take you all of 10 minutes to do this. You know how efficient we are as an industry, so make it happen. Also to Lawrence, I wanted to just mention one quick little thing. I just saw an interview with the president, a CEO of ETSY Oh, who's trying to include, because a lot of those people, there's no way to track their income as well. 

 

Lawrence Lewis:

Right. 

 

Sister Christian:

So a lot of at home artisans right now are feeling the pain because none of you know the people who shop on ETSY, are able to shop right now because they don't have a paycheck, 

 

Lawrence Lewis:

Right, of course.

 

Sister Christian:

Yeah. So wanted to throw that out there as well.

 

Lawrence Lewis:

A lot of people hurting to find those petitions and form letters, go to our website producers happy hour dot com and click the tab. Take action. Okay! Should we get onto her interview?

 

Sister Christian:

Yes! I'm very excited about this. 

 

Lawrence Lewis: 

Alright.  So as I said, Cliff Zellman has been in the production industry for over 35 years. He began his career as an assistant engineer in Los Angeles at the age of 19 and then became a chief audio engineer working with such artists as Fleetwood Mac. Hall and Oats, Al Stewart, England Dan, Alice Cooper, so many others. He then moved into live dialogue recording for animation at Saban Entertainment and then moved into marketing and advertising at Radio Vision as a chief audio engineer and client creative services, writing, casting, recording, producing strategic ad campaigns that are focused on the automotive industry. Now he's working with ACM Management Agency, working specifically with voiceover talent, helping them hone their skills for automotive campaigns. So he brings a unique perspective to this. And we were talking about yesterday that, you know, we had Sarah Starling's voice memo on, that we do want to kind of address the actors out there in our community. We can't forget the actors, you know. We always talk about cruel and producers, but actors are part of our team, and they're really hurting right now. So Cliff kind of brings a unique perspective to that. And, uh, you know, talks about things that actors could do during this time. And he also has some insight as to what's happening out there in the local regional ad world. So let's take a listen. All right, here he is everybody. Welcome, Cliff Zellman. Welcome, Cliff.

 

Sister Christian:

Hey Cliff.

 

Cliff Zellman:

Thank you for having me.

 

Sister Christian:

Thanks for coming.

 

Lawrence Lewis:

Thank you so much for your time. I know I just kind of read a little bio about you, but why don't you give us a little rundown of, of who you are? What your experience in the industry, what you've been doing and kind of your new career shift just before all this started.

 

Cliff Zellman:

Well, um, started back in 1979. Spent 20 years in L. A. As a rock and roll recording engineer in Studio City. That was kings of fun. As I got older, I kind of wanted to get away from the four o'clock in the morning based sessions and rock and roll lifestyle. So I got more in voiceover for animation

 

Lawrence Lewis:

as a recording engineer. Yeah,

 

Cliff Zellman:

As the week that was called the Recordist or the Fader Thrower. I'm reading along with the script and I'm throwing favors and I'm sweating and my palms were driven and it was very stressful, but a lot of fun in the 94 earthquake hit. We were looking for a new place to live in San Fernando Valley. And funny because the prices were, you know, 350,000 for a house without God. 

 

Sister Christian:

I’ll take two. Yeah that take four Celtic.  

 

Lawrence Lewis:

Yeah, 

 

Cliff Zellman:

So we went in Princeton. My brother saw a beautiful house, moved in January 1st, 1995. He immediately got hooked up with company called Radio Vision that specializes in automotive advertising. And this was the perfect thing for me. I didn't want to really do rock and roll anymore. So I got to keep all of my production shops on my engineering knowledge and bang out 32nd spots. It was great. I didn't have to queue a snare drum, you know, for 22 hours. No, you've been great, you know, hundreds, and really focusing for the last 25 years, 24, 25 years on the boys town.  And that's really, uh, you know, has been my passion for last 20 years.

 

Lawrence Lewis:

And so at radio vision, you were mostly working on automotive advertising. Correct?

 

Cliff Zellman:

Almost exclusively. I would say 95%. We had maybe the periodic furniture store,

 

Sister Christian:

Maybe a monster truck show something really awesome. 

 

Cliff Zellman:

Yeah.Yeah. Yeah. Or a bent with a digger.

 

Lawrence Lewis:

Yeah. And were these mostly were these mostly radio spots. Or do you do the both.

 

Cliff Zellman:

50-50 

 

Lawrence Lewis:

50-50

 

Sister  Christian:

Uh hmmm.

 

Cliff Zellman:

Exclusively 32nd television spots. Never sixties radio and every radio spot in almost every TV spot. We also did a Spanish version, so that was wonderful for everyone spot, two VOs were hired. 

 

Lawrence Lewis:

Wow. You know, a lot of stuff for Internet bobbed on his car. Cliff Zelman, Honda be like, uh and of course, what's going on now? We're going to talk about that? Well,

Lawrence Lewis:

Yeah, a whole different thing. And before we get there, I want to kind of dive in a little bit. I don't know how many of our listeners work in the automotive space and we're talking dealerships, right? I don't think they know the volume that goes into that. How many spots were you turning out?

 

Sister Christian:

All of them? It's That's like…

 

Cliff Zellman:

Well, the thing is, when it comes to two or three advertising dealership advertising, Tier two is regional and tier one N,ational with Tier three, a dealership and owner of dealership, could have multiple dealerships. He can have a Ford dealership. There are in any given time, 14, 15, 16 automotive manufacturers across the world importing to the United States as well as domestic each one of those manufacturers have five or six different models. Each model needs an ad that's only good for a week because insanity change every week. 

 

Sister Christian:

Yeah.

 

Cliff Zellman:

So we create doughnuts. We do drop ins. We do new spots. Radio vision. On a insane week, we could pull off 100 and 20 spots on average.

 

Sister Christian:

Holy shit. Just holy shit.

 

Cliff Zellman:

You guys see, on an average week, I would say anywhere between 40, the 60 spots I would do four or five or six. John would do four or five or six .Twelve spot today that would sometimes include 32nd spots or 62nd spots cut down and 30 in the cotton religion. We need a new read. It's not just taking 60 seconds and cutting it down. Things orders change in flex its change price points and bullets change. But radio vision nuts men. Yeah,

 

Lawrence Lewis:

yeah, that's wild. You bring a unique perspective because Christian, you and I don't think we've ever understood that kind of volume before, you know? 

 

Sister Christian:

No, it's completely different than what we do is what's really unique perspective. You must know that industry so well. After doing so many spots week after week,

 

Cliff Zellman:

it's as far as content. Absolutely. As far as delivery. Yeah, absolutely. As far as what the agencies and dealerships we're looking for. Absolutely. 

 

Lawrence Lewis:

Exactly. 

 

Cliff Zellman:

I'm not a marketing whiz by

 

Lawrence Lewis:

No, we're not. We're not. We're not. We're not, either.

 

Sister Christian:

I break in and ask where you located right now in the 

 

Cliff Zellman:

Dallas, Texas. 

 

Sister Christian:

Oh, nice. And how are you doing yourself?

 

Cliff Zellman:

Me personally? I'm doing 

 

Sister Christian:

Yes. 

 

Cliff Zellman:

Three weeks ago, I was in Milwaukee. I was in Chicago. I took two planes. I took two trains. I had unlimited Uber's. Ahh meet. And I was terrified. And as of not, you know, two days ago sending with Sundat before, um, the three of us, my wife, myself and my daughter have been absolutely isolated. But back to back to volume Current voice talent that are currently voicing four tier three automotive are seeing a little bit of a hit on start up a new production. But as far as the revisions go, and basically redoing everything that they've done for the last three weeks is crazy. Um, Walling production houses across the country. I'm talking to voice talent, automotive voice talent. And this story is pretty much the same. That hobby is we're here to help our service bay hours are. Our though our showroom is closed online We’ll deliver your car to you.

 

Lawrence Lewis:

You mentioned the messaging turn. We were just talking about this yesterday. Think with Anca Christian. Uh, messaging being we're here for you. Have you seen more change in town? Because I remember. And I'm sure I don't know what you were working on around 9 11 but you know, Christian, I were both producing commercials or production mention commercials back then, And the tone shifted quickly to, you know, that warm, comforting read, Um, and those warm, comforting lessons together 

 

Sister Christian:

We're in this together

 

Lawrence Lewis:

We're in this together. It was always, ah, warm, friendly approach. Are you saying that kind of shift right now in the messaging from automotive?

 

Cliff Zellman:

Well, he mentioned 9 11 and it was a long time ago. 

 

Lawrence Lewis:

Yeah. 

 

Cliff Zellman:

How about this If you've been affected by last week's tornadoes, if you've been affected by last week's flood, if you need it was damaged in last month's Hale Store. Take every one of those at any given week or any given month across the country, add we're here to help Yeah men. Absolutely, so none. It's not just since nine. I mean, you know, especially living in South here, living in Dallas. You know, we're basically the tornado belt. Dallas isn't, but Weatherford sure is. And that's just a little bit West Fort Worth and Fort Worth, so about 30 miles away from us, So that part of the country that you can't see me, but that goes North, East, you know, basically, from the Gulf up. Um, every week there's something so we are very used to jumping into emergency recovery comfort mode. I've got a slew of voice talents that just sound like that. 

 

Lawrence Lewis:

Yeah, it's…

 

Sister Christian:

Well, I think it was more about, Ah, the collective, you know, comfort. That's going on. Just like right after the great recession hit in 2008 2009. I noticed that my work was going from car commercials to discount brands like Walmart or Burlington Coat Factory. Or, you know, just um, that's who is advertising because they could offer you a deal for your money, right? But it was a more collective thing throughout the entire country, and I think that's what's happening right now. It's not just a focused like you're saying for, um, you know, my sister lives in Nashville there, absolutely focusing a lot of things on Nashville, which they should. That tornado is horrible, but also to this is this is bigger than us. What's happening right now? It's worldwide, right?

 

Cliff Zellman:

But here's the good news.

 

Sister Christian:

Mmm…

 

Cliff Zellman:

It's very, very pointed. Which means it's one problem. It's not famine. 

 

Cliff Selman :

multiple times. What's happening right now is one single problem, and as soon as this as soon listen to me when the problem is

 

Sister Christian:

fit. My only counter or what I understand I only counter to that is that this is the one problem that's affecting an artery. Single person's

 

Cliff Zellman:

true, and that's why it’s…

 

Sister Christian:

so, Yeah, and the, um, the empathy and that we should have for each other, isn't it? Isn't there quite yet for everybody? So it's getting there. I hope so. I do because it's pretty rough out there. 

 

Cliff Zellman:

I think Tempe's going to teach us an awful lot. You know, One person said that about ourselves, that nature saying you go back to your room and you think about what you've been doing exactly. I believe you know,

Sister Christian:

a lot of people have that theory.

Lawrence Lewis:

Hey, So, Cliff, I want it. I want to ask you since your days at radio Vision, you have now shifted. And you're not working with a talent agency, Is that correct?

 

 

Cliff Zellman:

This talent management agency? Yes, ACM talent management if this is a dream, you know. So since January, I've been in V o Nirvana. I'm I'm new to the whole management contractual legal thing, but that's okay, you know, they don't need No, I don't need to get involved in allegations about contracts and all that stuff. I just want to make sure that anybody that wants to do automotive either within him or outside and then approach however they want to do it t t 3 to 3 local is great because you can mark it yourself. But

 

Lawrence Lewis:

I by reaching out directly directly to companies

 

Cliff Zellman:

directly to automotive dealerships, to automotive advertising agencies to having a presentation that's Pandora worthy and Pandora's is wonderful because they don't. They're looking for the highly produced automotive spot. They like the nice mid read so they can throw it across platforms. You know, there's plenty of, you know, opportunities. Now, I should say, Well, except as a a month and 1/2 ago, Uh, for the individual, the blue collar automotive voice actor to do 345 spot today. Uh, there, quick. You knock him out in 10 minutes.

 

Lawrence Lewis:

In speaking of the volume, Uh, in Houston, you before before the pandemic, you know, you gave some numbers. Ah, and I think you did say you were talking to some production companies and some some actors. That number has taken a dip, but you're seeing more renewals. Revisions? Is that

 

Cliff Zellman:

Not snowing? Clients dropping off of rosters. I'm not seeing a lot of new production, all news, but I'm seeing tons of revisions two weeks ago. Scripts now has this pulled out. Maybe the first line or two revised to at Lawrence Messaging board. We're keeping our or so arm hearts are open, but our doors maybe closed. You know, that kind of thing and then having the home studio and being the voice of the dealership for so long drop ins or seamless, they don't sound, you know, the engine. Very important all the boy's talents list and get your own studios.

 

Lawrence Lewis:

So let's talk about that because most of our audiences is crew. But I know we do have, you know, a good amount of actors that listen to this as well. And we were just talking about this yesterday. Christian. How actors. They're not only, you know, and I know this is a little bit of a stereotype, and I don't mean to insult anybody, but it's true that here in L. A actors who aren't on a big Siri's, they do have service jobs, service industry jobs to help make ends meet. And now those service industry jobs were gone. All productions come to a halt. So what can you say to them or to some of them that do maybe do have some voiceover experience, like, What can they be doing during this downtime? You're talking about home, studio and voiceover, and there seems to be still a lot of activity in this part of the industry. What advice can you give to actors right now? toe kind of make it through this time.

 

Cliff Zellman:

Well, the immediate advice hang tough. You know, obviously a positive attitude. Now's the time to go into your database. Now's the time to go back and check any contact that you may have skimmed over. Dive in, delinked in actors and crew and a tough one of my best friends is the head cinematographer for Big Bang theory, Will and Grace. All that stuff is production is shutting down. I know it's a Shay, but it's kind of a proposed best time to plant a tree is 20 years ago. Second best time right now. Learn if you if you're an actor, you know acting is the second word and voice acting. It's much more important to be a good actor than to have a great voice. Mmm, understanding what you're doing now, and here comes the challenge. You know, actors spend years honing their craft when they're not honing their craft. They're doing exactly what Lauren said. Doing what they can do to survive, continue to hone their craft. And that's the paramount of admiration for me. Is that person slinging dishes and flipping burgers, you know, Monday, Tuesday to go on the call Friday. You know, uh so hang tough as far as getting into voiceover, unless you've got a handle on audio engineering. And I am not recommending going to Carson, buying $100 microphone, buying $100 interface and putting up a flag saying I am now a voice actor working from my home studio. It's a whole another hat to put on. Um, there's a ton of people out there that can help you if anybody act. Actors are out there and they're looking to get into home. Studio voiceover. Please get in touch with me. You know, I've been studying audio engineering for 45 years to say you're going to get it down in a week I've wasted for E. There's a lot to know and challenging. Yeah, but you know, it's tough, and I don't really have any advice other than to stay positive and be nice. And don't believe everything that you read.

 

Lawrence Lewis:

I saw somebody today on linked in post. If you've been looking to change your trajectory, reinvent yourself, explore a new dream job or a passion project. Now is the time no one's going out on auditions right now, not face to face.

 

Cliff Zellman:

 So I have certified by stock and zoom, you try to reinvent yourself and you don't think Well, I'm not going to make any money immediately. I think about how you can branch yourself out in 23 months from now. Learn? Yeah. Learn Reaper, Learn a no B audition.

 

Sister Christian:

Learn how

 

Cliff Zellman:

To stuff. You don't have to wait for the audition to come to you to learn. Grab a magazine. Start reading. Start editing download. There's free versions. Every software out there. Editing software out there has a free month, one month trial. You love it. Buy it. You don't move on, but use the downtime to really toe learn something to learn something that you can use in your arsenal. We're real smart as people, you know. We're very fragile, as you know, anti gnomic ignition block an eight foot wall without breaking both of our ankles. But when it comes to fighting, disease and and recovering and healing were pretty strong, you know, we're going to we're going to go through it. Um, the doomsday guys, they're going to be lost in two months from now, and business starts to come back up And those that air that a proactive now. So right now is the 20 years ago the plant, your tree And 20 years from now it's hopefully a month. And after two months from now, so we just took the the physical timeline Really great.

 

Sister Christian:

Yeah, The last three weeks feels

 

Cliff Zellman:

Like here. So I mean, it was like, Wow, what here this week has been

 

Sister Christian:

Yes, it’s crazy.

 

Cliff Zellman:

I'm a lot of lot of zoom a lot of talking to people 10 minutes before we started the zoom, the owner from Radio Vision calling just to chat just to say, Yeah,

 

Lawrence Lewis:

I know I've been talking to friends I haven't talked to in a long time and doing face time chats of which I've never done. And it's been great. I've really enjoyed it. I feel like I'm connecting Maurin away to people that I haven't done. You know, we're full up and we're working, and, you know, we're so busy and we just

 

Cliff Zellman:

Forget that's going to be the silver lining. When we go back to being able to meet each other and arrested and we accidentally bump into each other, it's not going to be eight is going to be Oh, sorry. Oh, I'm so sorry. We're going to be so much nicer because we're going to appreciate hopefully being together again. And that's what I'm looking forward to.

Lawrence Lewis:

Now I I know this might be an unfair question, but if you had a crystal ball if you had a crystal ball And I know you're there on the actor side now rather than the production side. But if you look into your crystal ball, where do you see the industry going? And you can keep it toe automotive advertising or whatever you feel comfortable speaking to and the next? I don't know, 3 to 6 months next year. When do you see things coming back? Full steam as they were, is some sort of new adoration of our business. What do you What do you see? That lies ahead of us

 

Cliff Zellman:

From a voice actors perspective and from a pro active voice actress perspective, I think this is an excellent opportunity to get your ducks in a row. I think it's an excellent opportunity to get your home studio working in three months from that in six months from now. Hopefully we're going to be laughing about this hopefully we're going to have homes about, you know, aliens going. Ha, ha. The experiment worked or you know, of a good lord saying Thank you for listening. I didn't know any other way of telling you guys to just chill out, but those that can make it through it, obviously, you're going to come out stronger. Um, my crystal ball is really fuzzy right now. I hate this.

 

Sister Christian:

I think there is a lot of yeah,

 

Cliff Zellman:

with medical narration with the learning those that understand medical narration in the learning that have a great home studio that have agents that have all this stuff in place. They're going to be doing better.

 

Lawrence Lewis:

We're also bringing in a little voice memos from people out there in the film production. Immediate production community. Yesterday we had Sarah Starling. I don't know if you know her. She's in the UK. She sent in a little voice memo. It warmed our hearts. She just had such a positive, positive little attitude about what is going on in such a warm message for everybody. Very similar to what you're

 

Cliff Zellman:

saying. I'm coming across warm because you know, I mean, there are there are realities. Obviously, that we're all facing, But I have to look at at this on Lee from my position and my wife's in the living room running Samsung talk. It is in the dining room doing great water. Call it work way.

 

Sister Christian:

We want to thank you so much, Cliff for your time. We really appreciate it. Uh, yeah. I mean, out to end on a positive note is a positive. 

 

Cliff Zellman:

It’s going to be okay. We are strong, really smart. And we're going to do it. We're going to do it.

 

Sister Christian:

I believe that. Thank you again for your time. We really appreciate it.

 

Lawrence Lewis:

Thank you, Cliff.

 

Sister Christian:

Wow, Laurence, you know, I have to say best time to plant a tree is 20 years ago. The second best time is today. That one kind of rings home right now. Some real words of wisdom.

 

Lawrence Lewis:

I think so.

 

Sister Christian:

You know

 

Lawrence Lewis:

Again, as I said in the interview, I saw somebody post on lengthen and you know, you don't have to take it in such a grandiose way. But now's the time. Now's the time to really dig in and figure out what makes you happy. Going back to, you know, the kind of thing we've been talking about the world's hit the pause button for us to all think about what really is important.

 

Sister Christian:

I agree. And I would just like to know how many times his daughter has heard that expression with my roll. Dad, Dad.

 

Lawrence Lewis:

But you know, he obviously has a passion for actors and voiceover and a crazy amount of passion for automotive industry car spots. Um, and it's good to hear that, just like we said after 911, lot of revisions, lot of renewals. Postproduction still happening, on and and it's just stay positive. The people that have a doomsday attitude about this will not be able to ramp up when things come back online. Stay out. Stay smart. We should be prepared. Yeah.

 

Sister Christian:

Yes. Great. Well, I mean, I think that's it for the day. Right, Lawrence?

 

Lawrence Lewis:

I think so. Um, Christian, take care. I'll talk to you tomorrow.

 

Sister Christian:

Let's be safe on your drive.

 

Lawrence Lewis:

I will. Yes, me safe in New York and everybody out there. Stay safe and stay connected and stay active.

 

Sister Christian:

Uh, don't forget to wash your hands and don't be like me and touch your face. Let's try to make sure you're not touching your face.

 

Lawrence Lewis:

But no, I saw you do it a few times.

 

Sister Christian:

I mean, I would say a few times would be a little generous. I think I did it 47 times. Knock it off, knock it off and stay home. I'm alone.

 

Lawrence Lewis:

True. And stay home. Everybody, please stay home. Yes, please. There's no reason to go outside. Do your part. It's in your hands. Stay home. Be sure to send us your voice recordings and emails to producershappyhour@gmail.com and Christian, how can people get a hold of you directly?

 

Sister Christian:

You can reach me at www.SisterChristianproduces.com and Lawrence, how do people reach you directly?

 

Lawrence Lewis:

www.lawrencetewis.com or for voiceover, www.voiceoflawrence.com.

 

Sister Christian:

Great. Thank you. 

 

Lawrence Lewis:

Bye!